Diet with tuna: the weekly menus for healthy weight loss

Diet with tuna: the weekly menus for healthy weight loss

In its fresh or preserved version, tuna is a food loved by the whole family that brings useful substances to our body

Nutritious, good and loved by the whole family: tuna is a food that also boasts a world day which is celebrated on May 2nd. Present in abundance in our Mediterranean Sea, even in its preserved version it is rich in nutrients and today it is experiencing a new "golden age", so much so that according to the research "The consumption of canned tuna during the lockdown", carried out by Doxa for Ancit (Association of Fish and Tuna Preservers), 1 out of 2 Italians increased their consumption during the months of lockdown. The reasons? The ability to keep for a long time and easily, its accessibility, because it is a valid substitute for fresh fish and is a rewarding food that helps to endure difficult times, revealing a purchasing behavior also linked to its more emotional dimension.

Index

  • The nutritional properties
  • Which one to choose
  • Recipes
  • The tuna diet
  • The menus of the week
    • MONDAY
    • TUESDAY
    • WEDNESDAY
    • THURSDAY
    • FRIDAY
    • SATURDAY
    • SUNDAY

The nutritional properties

Versatile, easy and quick to cook, tuna is also an extremely useful food for our body. In general, bringing tuna to the table is equivalent to taking a mix of nutrients that contributes to the proper functioning of our body, such as:

  • High biological value proteins, useful for counteracting sarcopenia, a condition that occurs over the years in all subjects, but in particular in those who have practiced physical activity, albeit at an amateur level.
  • Omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, in particular EPA and DHA, important for keeping blood cholesterol levels under control, decreasing the "bad" LDL and causing the "good" HDL to increase. Not only that: scientific research has long since confirmed their virtues in the prevention of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. In addition, omega 3 fatty acids play an essential role in protecting the human body from inflammation and in strengthening its defenses.
  • Iodine: it provides an average of 50-100 µg per 100 grams of food. An important mineral for the synthesis of thyroid hormones. It allows regular development and growth in the developmental age, optimizes the metabolism of adults, counteracts the loss of muscle mass in the elderly, helps strengthen the immune system and facilitates an excellent psychophysical balance.
  • Potassium, a constituent of cell membranes essential for muscle contraction and for the transmission of nerve impulses.
  • Vitamin A and group B, important for countless biological functions.
  • Iron, an element necessary for the synthesis of red blood cells.
  • Vitamin D. Although 90% is synthesized by our skin through direct exposure to sunlight, a small part can be introduced by foods that contain this substance, such as tuna. The main role of vitamin D is to maintain adequate mineralization of the skeleton for the prevention of osteoporosis and to strengthen the immune system. It is also believed that it has an important role in the prevention of vascular diseases: in fact it has a protective role on all vessels and intervenes in the biological processes that regulate the contractility of the arteries.

Not everyone knows that tuna is also an excellent source of selenium, a mineral essential for countless biological functions, including the functioning of the thyroid gland, the immune system and an excellent ally against oxidative stress.

Which one to choose

In our seas there are different varieties of tuna. From the red one, considered the most valuable but also the one most at risk of extinction, to the albacore (or white tuna) of which the eggs are particularly appreciated, to the yellow fin tuna: the type that we all know best because it is the one used from the canning industry. Then there is the skipjack tuna, extremely widespread in the Mediterranean Sea and considered the most fished variety in the world, which has a dark pink flesh, tender and with a slightly bitter taste.

“In its fresh or preserved version, everyone can choose their tuna according to their needs”, explains Dr. Corrado Pierantoni, specialist in endocrinology and metabolic diseases and clinical nutritionist in Lanciano (Ch). “Those who, for example, have a nickel allergy and prefer preserves for convenience, can opt for tuna in a glass jar rather than in a can. If you suffer from hypertension, a cardiovascular disease in which it is necessary to reduce the daily sodium intake, fresh tuna is a valid choice, perhaps opting for a variety caught in the Tyrrhenian Sea or in the Mediterranean which, compared to the Adriatic, is less salty. ".

Recipes

Raise your hand if you don't have a tin of tuna in the pantry: an ingredient that gives personality to simple and traditional recipes. In fact, it is mainly used to dress salads or side dishes and in the preparation of first courses, but it is also widely used for traditional recipes, such as rustic pizzas, stuffed vegetables, tuna meatloaf, etc.

Good on everything, therefore, in its preserved version it also has excellent sustainability prerogatives: in addition to having a long shelf life, that is the period of time in which it keeps its quality characteristics intact under normal conditions of use, it does not require energy for its conservation because we can store it in the pantry, at room temperature.

Today, then, experts recommend not throwing away the preservation oil. "I agree too – says Dr. Pierantoni – because the oil keeps all its organoleptic characteristics intact. Using the one already present in the jar or box allows us to limit the addition of other oil, helping to waste less, to season a pizza or bruschetta or as an ingredient for numerous preparations, such as sautéed for a good tuna pasta " .

The tuna diet

"As part of a healthy diet – explains the expert – fish should be present on our tables 4 times a week. Of these, 2 can possibly be covered with preserved tuna. Green light, then, to fruit and vegetables, at least 5 portions a day of the two foods in total; meat in moderation, preferably choosing white or less fat; carbohydrates preferably in grains and wholemeal (brown rice, barley, spelled, quinoa, buckwheat, bulgur …) and legumes. If you want a nice plate of pasta, why not, I recommend consuming it at dinner to promote sleep at night, twice a week ".

The bread? "Better that naturally leavened, made with sourdough, and toasted – advises the doctor and nutritionist – so the humidity is moved outside and the glycemic index of the food is lowered. All of these strategies, together with moderate daily physical activity, can help not only to maintain body weight in the normal range, but also to lose weight if there is any need ", concludes Dr. Pierantoni.

The menus of the week

MONDAY

BREAKFAST: Green tea or coffee; 1 low-fat white yogurt HD (lactose-free) with 1 tablespoon of oat flakes; 1 small piece of fruit salad

MORNING SNACK: 1 seasonal fruit

LUNCH: Valerian salad, tuna, carrots, cucumbers, lemon peel and 2 boiled potatoes

AFTERNOON SNACK: 1 seasonal fruit; 1 cup of green tea

DINNER: Brown rice with beets, cherry tomatoes, carrots and celery

AFTER DINNER: 1 herbal tea

TUESDAY

BREAKFAST: Green tea or coffee; 1 glass of oat milk and 1 slice of toast with 1 teaspoon of extra virgin olive oil

MORNING SNACK: 1 seasonal fruit

LUNCH: Chicken curry with basmati rice; steamed asparagus

AFTERNOON SNACK: 1 seasonal fruit; 3 walnuts

DINNER: Tagliatelle with artichokes, fresh mint and lemon zest; sautéed chard

AFTER DINNER: 1 seasonal fruit

WEDNESDAY

BREAKFAST: Green tea or coffee; 1 low-fat white yogurt HD (lactose-free); 2 wholemeal rusks with a veil of honey

MORNING SNACK: 1 seasonal fruit

LUNCH: Lettuce salad; breaded anchovies; 1 slice of toast

AFTERNOON SNACK: 1 seasonal fruit; 20 g of 80% dark chocolate

DINNER: Roman-style artichokes; legume and cereal salad with 4 vegetables (rice, peas, cherry tomatoes, carrots, sliced ​​celery, asparagus tips and 1 hard-boiled egg)

AFTER DINNER: 1 herbal tea

THURSDAY

BREAKFAST: Green tea or coffee; 1 yogurt; 1 slice of toast with 1 teaspoon of extra virgin olive oil

MORNING SNACK: 1 seasonal fruit

LUNCH: Steamed spinach; chickpea hummus with vegetables in pinzimonio (fennel, carrots and celery); 1 slice of toast

AFTERNOON SNACK: 1 seasonal fruit; 1 tablespoon of unsalted peanuts

DINNER: Zucchini rolls stuffed with fresh cheese and chopped basil; 1 slice of toasted wholemeal bread

AFTER DINNER: 1 herbal tea

FRIDAY

BREAKFAST: Green tea or coffee; 1 glass of almond milk (or HD milk); 3 dry biscuits

MORNING SNACK: 1 seasonal fruit

LUNCH: Pokè bowl with seared salmon, mixed salad, basmati rice, avocado and red currant

AFTERNOON SNACK: 1 seasonal fruit; 1 cup of green tea

DINNER: Cherry tomato salad; pasta and lentils

AFTER DINNER: 1 herbal tea

SATURDAY

BREAKFAST: Green tea or coffee; 1 omelette consisting of 2 egg whites and 1 yolk; 1 slice of toast

MORNING SNACK: 1 seasonal fruit

LUNCH: Mixed salad; bean and pea soup

AFTERNOON SNACK: 1 seasonal fruit; 5 almonds

DINNER: Grilled chicken breast; Pumpkin In Batter flowers; 1 slice of toasted wholemeal bread

AFTER DINNER: 1 seasonal fruit

SUNDAY

BREAKFAST: Green tea or coffee; 1 portion of fresh ricotta; 1 slice of toast

MORNING SNACK: 1 seasonal fruit

LUNCH: Tagliatelle alla carbonara with asparagus

AFTERNOON SNACK: 1 mixed centrifuged; 20 g of 80% dark chocolate

DINNER: Mixed salad; 1 can of natural tuna; steamed chicory; 1 slice of toasted wholemeal bread

AFTER DINNER: 1 herbal tea

Read also

  • The May Diet. Cleanse the liver and find new energy
  • The April diet: the menus of the week to combat spring fatigue
  • The Fast diet to deflate the belly and reactivate the metabolism
  • The December diet: how to eat everything without gaining weight
  • The March diet: what to eat to face the change of season

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