Understanding delivery for students with SLD

Understanding delivery for students with SLD

Understanding the delivery of an exercise or a problem is fundamental for its development by students with SLD

Understanding delivery for students with SLD is the first hurdle to overcome.

Understanding the delivery of an exercise or a problem is fundamental for its development. However, the importance of clear delivery is very often underestimated, especially for students with SLD. Valentina Secchi, Learning Technician of a specialist After School, tells us her point of view.

Why is the topic of “understanding of delivery” important for students with SLD?

Understanding delivery in school language is “having understood what is required of me by a task, a verification”.

Although in almost all the diagnoses of ASD there is the wording: "Make sure you understand the delivery", this is very often underestimated by teachers but it remains a great Achilles' heel for our Super Fascinators.

From words to images… to words!

The Decidedly Super Fascinating doesn't think in words, but thinks in images and thinks at a dizzying speed, thousands of times faster than those who think with words, as Ronald Davis – sculptor and engineer, founder of an important help center for dyslexics – reminds us in California – in his famous book "The Gift of Dyslexia" (Ronald D. Davis is founder of the Reading Search Council, director of the Dyslexia Correction Center in California and president of the Davis Research Foundation).

In order to speak, the DSA must translate images into words. You think you have a series of well-detailed images in front of you, and you have to describe them in words! It is by no means simple, and in any case it is a job that requires organization and takes time: looking for the necessary words, once found, putting them in order, taking care of the form, the syntax, finally giving voice to all this.

Decoding is clearly laborious even in the reverse sense: from words to arrive at an image and then transform it back into words.

"What needs do you have today Marta?" We asked one of our after-school girls one day.

"So today I have to sleep because I'm tired, then I'm hungry …"

In reality my colleague and I were asking Marta about her school needs for the day, another way of saying: "What homework do you have today?".

But the logic of Marta, linked as for many Super Fascinators to the literal meaning of the word, has rightly answered by listing her life needs.

One day Silvia, during after school, was in the mood to chat and we talked about the fact that the DSA boys are not understood: «It's like an hourglass» – she said to me – «Really, Silvia? Tell me well. What do you mean?" I reply, delighted to be able to learn something new. "In an hourglass the sand slowly descends from one bowl to another and so for us the words. For that it takes its time, we have to transform the image into words ".

Here, "find the words"; and this reverse decoding from words to images allows the DSA to understand the famous "delivery".

Understanding of delivery for SLD students

In my kids' tests, sometimes you see some puzzle-like questions from the Puzzle Week or Susy's question … which I too (I may be a little old by now) struggle to understand or in any case take a moment to organize in my mind. Those who do not particularly like reading-writing (such as students with SLD) very often have some difficulty in understanding the meaning of some sentences, especially if they contain double negatives or words that are not in common use.

Someone at this point might think: "Eh, okay, then that's why dyslexia and the like are called learning disabilities." Eh, no, stop everyone! Now it is clear to me: disturbance, yes, but only for THAT type of learning, for the school system as we know it, the so-called traditional one.

Tag: Dyslexia

Category: Mom
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