Colorectal cancer: an offbeat awareness campaign encourages screening

Colorectal cancer: an offbeat awareness campaign encourages screening

On this first day of March, Blue Mars begins, a month for raising public awareness of colorectal cancer screening. In Montpellier, health professionals chose to talk about it in a humorous way, in order to play down the drama of the subject.

The month of March is traditionally associated with the color blue and raising public awareness of colorectal cancer screening. In Montpellier, health professionals relied on humor to talk about it.

Second cause of cancer death

If the authorities want to play down colorectal cancer screening, it is because the disease continues to claim victims: it is the third most common cancer in the general population and the second cause of cancer mortality.

Every year, 42,000 people are diagnosed. And paradoxically, while there is an easy-to-perform screening test, colorectal cancer remains very rarely screened: only a third of the age group concerned carries it out every two years, or 34.6% of those aged 50-74. years.

You are invited to “assume the throne”

To raise awareness of this issue, health stakeholders at the Montpellier Regional Cancer Institute have focused on an offbeat campaign to raise awareness about this screening. Those affected are invited to “mount the throne,” referring to the toilets needed to use to complete the screening exam.

Remember that the kit is free and you can ask your general practitioner, your pharmacist or order it online.

A cancer that treats very well if caught in time

For TipsForWomens medical director Gérald Kierzek, the importance of raising awareness of colorectal cancer screening is crucial. “Effectively, less than a third of 50-74 year olds do this test, even though it is quite simple to perform and easy to access” deplores the emergency doctor. “However, colorectal cancer detected early increases the chances of being cured, in 90% of cases.” he adds.

And it is possible to detect pre-cancerous lesions, polyps, even before reaching the cancer stage. We really need to insist on prevention and emphasize that burying our heads in the sand is useless: fear does not prevent danger.” he concludes.