“Don't sleep with wet hair, you'll catch a cold.” How much truth is there in grandma's old warnings?

"Don't sleep with wet hair, you'll catch a cold."  How much truth is there in grandma's old warnings?

Some people much prefer evening showers to morning showers. Some people even decide to go to bed with wet hair so as not to turn on the dryer. It is said that this practice is extremely harmful to our health. What is it really like?

Don't sleep with wet hair, you'll catch a cold.  How much truth is there in grandma's old warnings?

Can sleeping with wet hair endanger our health? Facts and myths

We often hear how bad it is for your health to go to bed with wet hair. However, not every rumor has much to do with the truth. So before we decide to take out the dryer, it is worth checking which of them translate into reality.

One of the most popular myths about sleeping with wet hair is that it can cause colds. I guess everyone has heard this at least once in their life. However, this is not entirely true. Colds are caused by viruses, not wet hair. They can give us an unpleasant feeling of cold or stick to our face, making it difficult to sleep. However, there is no link between wet hair and the common cold. While we're at it, it's also worth debunking the grandma's myth that going outside with wet hair can cause a cold. This is also far from the truth.

Another myth is that sleeping with wet hair can cause a headache or a stiff neck. There have been no studies on this subject that could confirm the truthfulness of these words. The only possible explanation is that at night we instinctively try to move away from cold and damp hair, thereby straining our neck. However, this is not scientifically confirmed in any way.

The grandmothers weren't wrong about that. Sleeping with wet hair can have consequences

Among the most popular sayings about sleeping with wet hair is that it can damage your hair. This time it's true. Dermatologist Timothy Schmidt from the University of Utah Health noted that wet hair is more brittle and susceptible to breakage than dry hair. As he explains, water weakens the protein structure of the hair, making it more flexible, easier to stretch and break. According to a 2015 study, stretching hair fibers to 30-70 percent of their original length can cause damage. To minimize friction, it is best to leave them to dry as long as possible and use a satin or silk pillowcase.

When it comes to sleeping with wet hair and dandruff, unfortunately our grandmothers were right here too. A humid environment is an ideal breeding ground for fungi that willingly settle there. Dandruff may then be the least of our problems. As emergency physician Dr. Chirag Shah explains, the moisture from wet hair can get into your pillow while you sleep. This, again combined with the heat we emit, creates ideal conditions for the development of yeast, which may increase the risk of fungal infection.

In the end